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Research library

SMART supports and promotes research into the effectiveness of information and communication technology (ICT) in a variety of learning environments around the world.

Browse our library and discover a wide range of local and international research about how K–12 and higher education students use education tools and resources to learn and interact in the classroom. The research is listed by subject for easy reference.


Acoustics and amplification

Classroom Acoustics for Children with Normal Hearing and with Hearing Impairment

This article examines several acoustical variables, such as noise, reverberation and speaker-listener distance, which can deleteriously affect speech perception in classrooms.

Crandell, Carl C.  - University of Florida
Smaldino, Joseph J. - University of Northern Iowa
USA

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Classroom Amplification to Enhance Student Performance

This study looks at classroom amplification in a variety of settings, including the general classroom, classrooms for students with hearing impairments and classrooms for students with learning disabilities.

“Research has shown benefits from the use of amplification devices in classrooms of students who demonstrate learning disabilities, as well as in regular classroom settings. Results of studies show that the listening and attending behaviors of students improved after implementation of amplification systems.” (p. 1)

DiSarno, Neil J. - Southwest Missouri State University
Schowalter, Melissa - Springfield, Missouri
Grassa, Patricia - Springfield Public Schools, Missouri
USA

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The Use of Sound Field Amplification of the Teacher’s Voice in the Regular Education Classroom – A Summary of Studies

In this study, the evidence for improved teaching and quality of instruction is reflected in the statistically significant gains in reading and language achievement test scores for K–12 students.

Results show that the quality of verbal instruction is enhanced with amplification because students receive clear, audible instructional signal throughout the classroom, regardless of other noises or of where they are seated. The teachers reported improved student attention, fewer distractions and less need to repeat instructions. Almost all students commented that the amplified teacher’s voice helped them pay attention, better understand verbal directions without distracting noises, and hear the teacher without having to strain (p 1).

Crandell Carl C. – University of Florida
USA

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Benefits of Sound Field Amplification in Kindergarten through Grade 3: A New Brunswick Provincial Study

This study explored the use of sound-field amplification technology in kindergarten through grade 3 classrooms in New Brunswick. It investigates the effects of amplification on communication during English classes and the procedures included both quantitative and qualitative design. In addition, feedback was sought on the perceptions of the teachers and students whose classrooms were amplified.

Rubin, Ronda, Catherine Aquino-Russell & Joan Flagg-Williams – New Brunswick
Canada

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Using Classroom Amplification in a Universal Design Model to Enhance Hearing and Listening

This study shows that sound field amplification systems increase students’ ability to hear and listen, improve acoustical environments and alleviate teachers’ vocal strain. They are easy to use, cost no more than other technology used in the classroom and are an example of how universal design principles benefit everyone.

Millett, Pamela - York University
Canada

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Creating Enhanced Learning Environments: The Benefits of Sound-Field Amplification Systems

This study aimed to establish whether sound-field amplification significantly improved educational achievement in the areas of listening, reading vocabulary, reading comprehension, mathematics and phonological awareness.

Results show that sound-field technology improves learning and literacy outcomes, creates enhanced classroom harmony, improves student behavior and reduces vocal strain for teachers. Sound-field achieves this by overcoming problems associated with noise, distance and reverberation (p. 5).

Heeney, Michael
Australia

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English language acquisition

A SMARTer Way to Teach Foreign Language: The SMART Board Interactive Whiteboard as a Language Learning Tool

This research report first assesses the SMART Board interactive whiteboard and then measures its positive impact in foreign language classrooms.

Gérard, Fabienne & Jamey Widener – Cary Academy
USA

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The Effectiveness of the SMART Board while Instructing Limited English Proficient Learners

This project examined the literacy gains made by students with limited-English proficiency when taught with a SMART Board interactive whiteboard. (Spring 2008)

Wuerzer, Becky - Hillandale Elementary
USA

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Higher education

Physical Design Tools Support and Hinder Innovative Engineering Design

Engineers use various physical tools (e.g., computers, smart boards, notes, and prototypes) to support their design work. To understand cognitive processes underlying the innovative design process and to reveal the characteristics of innovation-supporting environments, the pattern of tool use was examined in 43 interdisciplinary engineering design teams enrolled in a full-semester product realization course. Successful teams (i.e., high and medium success groups) were found to use a SMART Board and physical prototypes consistently more often throughout the design process, whereas unsuccessful teams (i.e., low success group) used a computer, laptop, and paper notes more often.

Jooyoung Jang and Christian D. Schunn - Learning Research and Development Center, University of Pittsburgh
USA

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SMART Response™ interactive response systems provide valuable insights in large-group environments

The study, Investigating the use of student response systems to engage, monitor and extend the thinking of pre-service teachers, investigated the use of the SMART Response XE interactive response system, including two receivers and 200 remotes (clickers), in a large-group learning environment.

Jacobsen, Michele, Brent Davis – University of Calgary
Canada

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Report on the Use of the SMART Board Interactive Whiteboard in Physical Science

This project measured the effectiveness of a SMART Board interactive whiteboard in physical science topics that require visualization of complex phenomena. (Summer 2000)

Damcott, Deborah, Janet Landato, Collette Marsh - Harper College
USA

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The Digital Whiteboard As a Notes-Taking Aid

This study analyzed students' attitudes toward, and test performance resulting from, the use of a digital whiteboard in an elementary statistics for the social sciences class. (Summer 2000)

Elvers, Greg - University of Dayton
USA

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The Effect of a SMART Board Interactive Whiteboard on Concept Learning, Generation of Ideas, Group Processes and User Interaction Satisfaction

This project studied a class of senior nursing students in an applied management course. (Summer 2000)

Howse, Ena, Donna Hamilton, Larry Symons - Queen's University
Canada

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Acquisition and Integration of SMART Board Interactive Whiteboard Skills: Gender Differences Among College Faculty, Staff and Graduate Assistants

This project assesses participation and skill acquisition levels by education students of both genders during SMART Board interactive whiteboard training (Summer 2003)

McNeese, Dr. Mary Nell - University of Southern Mississippi
USA

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Evaluation of SMART® Multimedia Classrooms: Impact on Student Face-to-Face Participation and E-Learning

This project shares the results of the evaluation of the $1.78 million Title III-A U.S. Department of Education (USDoE) grant to the University of Southern Mississippi from 2001 to 2006. This report focuses on the final two of three surveys administered to faculty to assess their technological needs and evaluates how well those needs were met over the life of the grant. The faculty concluded that the SMART® multimedia classrooms enhanced both student face-to-face participation and e-learning. (Spring 2007)

McNeese, Dr. Mary Nell - University of Southern Mississippi
USA

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Technology and Teacher Preparation: Creating Learning Environments for Increasing Student Involvement and Creativity

This study investigated a specific instructional strategy consisting of action, brainstorming, and development. (Summer 2001)

Nonis, Aileen, and Blanche O’Bannon - University of Tennessee
USA

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Using the Interactive Whiteboard to Increase Student Retention, Attention, Participation, Interest, and Success in a Required General Education College Course

This study examines the degree to which the use of the Internet and presentation technologies in a required general education American literature survey course impacts learning, with significant student retention results highlighted. (Summer 2002)

Tate, Dr. Linda - Shepherd College
USA

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The Importance of the Path Not Taken: The Value of Sharing Process as Well as Product

This study examines the semantic quality of database modeling diagrams by students in a computer science course and arrives at interesting results pertaining to the generation of layered diagrams with the SMART Board interactive whiteboard. (Summer 2003)

Vitolo, Dr. Theresa M. - Gannon University
USA

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History

The Influence of Technology Such As a SMART Board Interactive Whiteboard on Student Motivation in the Classroom

This project studied student motivation in an eighth grade American history class. (Winter 2001)

Weimer, Michael J. - West Noble Middle School
USA

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Impact on teaching and learning

Board or Bored?

The Nordic project focuses on the use of SMART board interactive whiteboards, classroom management tools, communication and evaluation to determine how effectively an interactive whiteboard, and other ICT tools, can be incorporated into a classroom. Observations of these factors include the search for innovation within educational design. The mixed methods study looked at 7th grade Norwegian language and Mathematics classrooms equipped with two SMART Boards each. As the study developed, teachers became more reflective in their practice and began to incorporate more digital technologies into their content. Students were more engaged in learning and collaborative discussion on content increased. The Notebook software supported the teacher identifying a more clear objective for the daily learning and lead students through engaging and directed discussions on the content. Study findings suggest teachers should forego reduplicating his or her traditional teaching methods when incorporating these new technologies, and instead develop new models for communication, reflection and evaluation with the goal of transforming their educational practices.

University Colleges in Vestfold, Buskerud, and Østfold and The Norwegian Centre for ICT in Education: Gunstiend Egeberg and Tor Arne Wolner (eds)
Norway

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Text Competencies and Interaction in Technology-Enhanced Classrooms: Enriching and Developing Subject-Didactics with Interactive Whiteboard in Focus

The goal of this Swedish study was to develop students' textual competence and linguistic awareness in 6th grade classrooms. This qualitative study collected data in the form of observational studies, teacher interviews, a series of work shops, meetings, and student questionnaires. The project resulted in the students having the opportunity to meet and develop language in different contexts facilitated by the SMART Board interactive whiteboard. In addition, the technology facilitated learning and encouraged activities and dialogue related to mathematics content. Teachers and students developed competencies on several levels including integration of the IWB and increased integration of digital media and content through the use of Notebook software. Teachers believed that with the SMART Board, it was easy to create stimulating and engaging lessons to motivate students. Teachers were stimulated by the efficiency and simplicity of creating lessons. They felt the ability to plan, prepare, and save their Notebook lessons to continue another time enabled a more effective classroom experience. Further, students felt they learned more when the interactive whiteboard was used in the classroom because they could collaborate and more easily discuss concepts.

Sylvana Sofkova Hashemi, University West
Sweden

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Physical Design Tools Support and Hinder Innovative Engineering Design

Engineers use various physical tools (e.g., computers, smart boards, notes, and prototypes) to support their design work. To understand cognitive processes underlying the innovative design process and to reveal the characteristics of innovation-supporting environments, the pattern of tool use was examined in 43 interdisciplinary engineering design teams enrolled in a full-semester product realization course. Successful teams (i.e., high and medium success groups) were found to use a SMART Board and physical prototypes consistently more often throughout the design process, whereas unsuccessful teams (i.e., low success group) used a computer, laptop, and paper notes more often.

Jooyoung Jang and Christian D. Schunn - Learning Research and Development Center, University of Pittsburgh
USA

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Supporting Behavioural Disorders and Dyslexia on Digital Tables

While specialized technologies exist to support learners with special needs, the majority of disabled learners are mainstreamed into regular classrooms. For this reason, educational technologies must deliver both regular and special needs tailored instruction. We describe how our multi-touch table leverages personal space to help students with behavioural disorder learn together. For learner that cannot yet read, or those with difficulty reading, speech support can provide assistance while freeing a teacher to focus on other core competencies.

Jessica Szeto, Edward Tse, Min Xin - SMART Technologies
CANADA

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The Use of a SMART Table to Increase On-task Behavior

This action research study explored the use of a SMART Table during math small groups to see its effects on on-task behavior. Hussain (2006) and Preston and Mowbray (2008) found that when technology is used in the classroom, teachers are better able to reach the needs of their students because of technology's ability to keep students engaged. Four male students (two with off-task tendencies and two with on-task tendencies) were observed for four weeks without the SMART Table and four weeks with the SMART Table. Results indicated that there were increases in on-task behaviors for all four students.

Warner, Taylor - University of Mary Washington
USA

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The Use of SMART Boards in Piloting Classroom Media Suites: Engaging students in transmedia learning and play

WestEd conducted a five-month pilot test of various transmedia gaming suites for the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB) and the Public Broadcasting Service (PBS). Transmedia gaming suites are comprised of thematically linked content presented across formats and across media devices. The use of SMART Boards was critical to the success of the pilot testing. This study found that using SMART Boards in the classroom considerably increases diverse students’ engagement and interest in learning.

Betsy McCarthy, PhD, Sara Atienza, Michelle Tiu, Danielle Yumol - WestEd
USA

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SMART Board ® interactive whiteboards shown to be highly effective for collaborative learning

Researchers at Riverview High School in New Brunswick, Canada, compared the performance of small groups completing learning activities on SMART Board ® interactive whiteboards to groups completing the same activities on laptops. They found that using an interactive whiteboard increased student performance on posttests, which were given to students after they finished the group activities on either an interactive whiteboard or a laptop.
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Interactive whiteboards significantly affect teaching and learning

This British research concludes that students exposed to a greater use of interactive whiteboards experienced accelerated progress.

British Educational Communications and Technology Agency (Becta)
United Kingdom

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Student Teachers’ Use of Technology-Generated Representations: Exemplars and Rationales

In this study, researchers at the University of Virginia conclude that SMART Board™ interactive whiteboards improve student learning outcomes and teacher quality of life when used with appropriate pedagogy and digital resources.

Juersivich, Nicole, Joe Garofalo & Virginia Fraser - University of Virginia
USA

Read the SMART research brief at smarttech.com/UVA_brief.

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What Classroom Technology Has Taught Me about Curriculum, Teaching, and Infinite Possibilities - Laura Christine Rochette

This report focuses on in-classroom experiences using interactive technology as tools for increasing reading and cultural literacy.

Rochette, Laura Christine - Marlborough School, Los Angeles
USA

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Student Engagement, Visual Learning and Technology: Can Interactive Whiteboards Help?

This research summarizes findings of surveys and questionnaires completed by middle-school students and teachers on their attitudes towards interactive whiteboards. The results indicate a strong preference among students and teachers for the use of interactive whiteboards in the classroom.

Beeland, William D. Jr.
USA

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Integrating Technologies for Teaching and Learning (2009-2011)

This project in progress will examine how SMART products are adopted and integrated for teaching and learning. Specific research designs, procedures and instrumentation will emerge through the researchers' collaborations with participating in-service and pre-service teachers.

Irvine, Valerie &  Allyson Hadwin - University of Victoria
Canada

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2004 Report: ICT in schools - the impact of government initiatives

In this report on ICT in schools, the UK Office for Standards in Education noted that when used by an effective teacher, an interactive whiteboard's power and versatility have helped produce excellent lessons.

Ofsted (Office for Standards in Education) - Manchester
United Kingdom

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The Motivational Effect of ICT on Pupils – Lancaster University (2004)

Don Passey and Colin Rogers, with Joan Machell and Gilly McHugh, wrote this report highlighting the use of ICT as a motivational learning component for the UK Department of Education and Skills. Among their findings, the team from Lancaster University's Department of Educational Research reports that interactive whiteboards are an important tool, along with Internet resources and presentation software, in facilitating improvements to the quality of student work.

Passey, Don & Colin Rogers, with Joan Machell and Gilly McHugh – Lancaster University
United Kingdom

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K-12

Board or Bored?

The Nordic project focuses on the use of SMART board interactive whiteboards, classroom management tools, communication and evaluation to determine how effectively an interactive whiteboard, and other ICT tools, can be incorporated into a classroom. Observations of these factors include the search for innovation within educational design. The mixed methods study looked at 7th grade Norwegian language and Mathematics classrooms equipped with two SMART Boards each. As the study developed, teachers became more reflective in their practice and began to incorporate more digital technologies into their content. Students were more engaged in learning and collaborative discussion on content increased. The Notebook software supported the teacher identifying a more clear objective for the daily learning and lead students through engaging and directed discussions on the content. Study findings suggest teachers should forego reduplicating his or her traditional teaching methods when incorporating these new technologies, and instead develop new models for communication, reflection and evaluation with the goal of transforming their educational practices.

University Colleges in Vestfold, Buskerud, and Østfold and The Norwegian Centre for ICT in Education: Gunstiend Egeberg and Tor Arne Wolner (eds)
Norway

MoreLess

Text Competencies and Interaction in Technology-Enhanced Classrooms: Enriching and Developing Subject-Didactics with Interactive Whiteboard in Focus

The goal of this Swedish study was to develop students' textual competence and linguistic awareness in 6th grade classrooms. This qualitative study collected data in the form of observational studies, teacher interviews, a series of work shops, meetings, and student questionnaires. The project resulted in the students having the opportunity to meet and develop language in different contexts facilitated by the SMART Board interactive whiteboard. In addition, the technology facilitated learning and encouraged activities and dialogue related to mathematics content. Teachers and students developed competencies on several levels including integration of the IWB and increased integration of digital media and content through the use of Notebook software. Teachers believed that with the SMART Board, it was easy to create stimulating and engaging lessons to motivate students. Teachers were stimulated by the efficiency and simplicity of creating lessons. They felt the ability to plan, prepare, and save their Notebook lessons to continue another time enabled a more effective classroom experience. Further, students felt they learned more when the interactive whiteboard was used in the classroom because they could collaborate and more easily discuss concepts.

Sylvana Sofkova Hashemi, University West
Sweden

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Teachers' Perceptions Regarding the Use of the Interactive Electronic Whiteboard in Instruction

This study used an online survey to investigate interactive whiteboard use in a range of educational settings. (Winter 1998)

Bell, Mary Ann - Baylor University
USA

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Gains in Self-Efficacy: Using SMART Board Interactive Whiteboard Technology in Special Education Classrooms

This project used cognitive/behavioral counseling, social-skills training, and the SMART Board interactive whiteboard to teach students with emotional/behavioral disorders. (Summer 2000)

Blanton, Bonnie & Helms-Breazeale, Rebecca - Augusta State University
USA

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Math Intervention “SMART” Project (Student Mathematical Analysis and Reasoning with Technology)

This project addressed improving grade one math scores through intervention programs. (Summer 2001)

Clemens, Anne, Traci Moore and Brian Nelson - Mueller Elementary School
USA

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Using the SMART Board Interactive Whiteboard to Create a Hands-on Approach to Learning Mathematics

This project investigated the use of a digital whiteboard to teach linear, nonlinear and exponential relationships in five grade-eight math classes. (Summer 2007)

Delaney, Michelle - Woodstown Middle School
USA

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Report on the Use of a SMART Board Interactive Whiteboard to Enhance Literacy in Teens

This study investigated the effect of the interactive whiteboard to help teenagers connect symbolism with texts and enhance overall literacy. (Summer 2007)

Fortuna, Carolyn - Taylor High School
USA

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Report on the Use of the SMART Board Interactive Whiteboard to Enhance Literacy in Children with Learning Disabilities

This study examined how, when embedded in the curriculum, the SMART Board interactive whiteboard can be used to improve students’ learning and motivation in the classroom. (Summer 2007)

Huck, Kelly & Schmitz, Doug - Bishop Roborecki School
USA

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Best Screen Play: A Comparison of Paired Team Play Using SMART Board Interactive Whiteboards versus Paired Individual Play Using Computers

This study analyzed the effectiveness of a SMART Board interactive whiteboard for grade six and seven students playing a mathematics computer game. (Summer 2000)

Klawe, Maria - University of British Columbia
Canada

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Helping All Children Learn: Action Research Project

This project records a teacher's observations of technology integration with grade three students, including two students with ADHD. (Summer 2002)

Jamerson, Joyce - Longfellow Elementary School
USA

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Enhancing Emergent Literacy Skills with SMART Board Interactive Whiteboard Technology

This study compared the academic performance of disabled students who learned emergent literacy on a digital whiteboard to that of students who received traditional literacy instruction. (Summer 2007)

Nordness, Philip - MacArthur Early Childhood Center
USA

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The Effect of Student-directed versus Traditional Teacher-centered Presentations of Content on Student Learning in a High School Statistics Class

This study compared the effects of two different instructional delivery methods on student learning in senior-level statistics classes. (Spring 2007)

Ottman, Laird - Haddon Heights Junior/Senior High School
USA

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The Effect of the SMART Board Interactive Whiteboard on Raising State Test Scores

This project studied the effect of the introduction of an interactive whiteboard on raising test scores by enhancing motivation, attentiveness and comprehension in a grade-three math class. (Summer 2007)

Oleksiw, Tammy - Parma Community School
USA

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Report on the Use of SMART Board Interactive Whiteboard as a Tool to Develop an Understanding of Fractions

This study compared the academic performance and motivation of students who were taught fractions on a digital whiteboard to students who received conventional math instruction. (Summer 2007)

Preisig, Jessica K.D. - Powdersville Middle School
USA

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Developing Self-Directed Learners and Teachers as Facilitators with SMART Board Interactive Whiteboard Technology

This project studied grade seven students in self-directed learning projects, as they planned and delivered presentations. (Summer 2001)

Roennigke, Pat, and Sue Carter - Saint Joseph School
USA

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The Aural Enabler: Creating a Way for Special Needs Kids to Participate in the Classroom Lesson

With a SMART Board interactive whiteboard being used for instruction, this study assesses the language skills of grades three and five special needs students. (Winter 2002)

Salinitri, Geri, Kara Smith and Christopher Clovis - University of Windsor
Canada

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"Rita Skeeter's Quick-Quotes Quill": Developing a Harry Potter Curriculum

This study analyzed grade seven student and teacher creative-writing exercises. (Summer 2001)

Smith, Kara - University of Windsor
USA

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SMART Technology Research Project at Dr. Gordon Townsend School

This research paper investigates the SMART Board interactive whiteboard’s potential impact on teaching and learning in an environment where many of the students have physical or mental difficulties. (Spring 2007)

Speight, Michelle and Curtis Slater - Dr. Gordon Townsend School
Canada

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The Digital Whiteboard As a Tool in Increasing Student Attention During Early Literacy Instruction

This study examined literacy lessons in a grade one classroom. (Summer 2001)

Solvie, Pamela A. - Morris Area Elementary School
USA

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The Influence of Technology Such As a SMART Board Interactive Whiteboard on Student Motivation in the Classroom

This project studied student motivation in an eighth grade American history class. (Winter 2001)

Weimer, Michael J. - West Noble Middle School
USA

MoreLess

Report on the Use of the SMART Board Interactive Whiteboard to Teach Language Arts to Children with Autism and Autistic-like Behaviors

This study compared the use of a SMART Board interactive whiteboard in teaching autistic children language arts to the use of a written newspaper containing identical information. (Summer 2007)

Wilcox, Jennifer - Kettering Middle School
USA

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Leveraging Interactive Whiteboards as a Core Classroom Technology

By analyzing the results of an online survey and looking at two case studies, authors of a THE Journal white paper find that interactive whiteboards are most effective when used as the core element to which other pieces of interactive technology are attached.

T.H.E. Journal
USA

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Student Engagement, Visual Learning and Technology: Can Interactive Whiteboards Help?

This research summarizes findings of surveys and questionnaires completed by middle-school students and teachers on their attitudes towards interactive whiteboards. The results indicate a strong preference among students and teachers for the use of interactive whiteboards in the classroom.

Beeland, William D. Jr.
USA

MoreLess
Language arts

Board or Bored?

The Nordic project focuses on the use of SMART board interactive whiteboards, classroom management tools, communication and evaluation to determine how effectively an interactive whiteboard, and other ICT tools, can be incorporated into a classroom. Observations of these factors include the search for innovation within educational design. The mixed methods study looked at 7th grade Norwegian language and Mathematics classrooms equipped with two SMART Boards each. As the study developed, teachers became more reflective in their practice and began to incorporate more digital technologies into their content. Students were more engaged in learning and collaborative discussion on content increased. The Notebook software supported the teacher identifying a more clear objective for the daily learning and lead students through engaging and directed discussions on the content. Study findings suggest teachers should forego reduplicating his or her traditional teaching methods when incorporating these new technologies, and instead develop new models for communication, reflection and evaluation with the goal of transforming their educational practices.

University Colleges in Vestfold, Buskerud, and Østfold and The Norwegian Centre for ICT in Education: Gunstiend Egeberg and Tor Arne Wolner (eds)
Norway

MoreLess

Text Competencies and Interaction in Technology-Enhanced Classrooms: Enriching and Developing Subject-Didactics with Interactive Whiteboard in Focus

The goal of this Swedish study was to develop students' textual competence and linguistic awareness in 6th grade classrooms. This qualitative study collected data in the form of observational studies, teacher interviews, a series of work shops, meetings, and student questionnaires. The project resulted in the students having the opportunity to meet and develop language in different contexts facilitated by the SMART Board interactive whiteboard. In addition, the technology facilitated learning and encouraged activities and dialogue related to mathematics content. Teachers and students developed competencies on several levels including integration of the IWB and increased integration of digital media and content through the use of Notebook software. Teachers believed that with the SMART Board, it was easy to create stimulating and engaging lessons to motivate students. Teachers were stimulated by the efficiency and simplicity of creating lessons. They felt the ability to plan, prepare, and save their Notebook lessons to continue another time enabled a more effective classroom experience. Further, students felt they learned more when the interactive whiteboard was used in the classroom because they could collaborate and more easily discuss concepts.

Sylvana Sofkova Hashemi, University West
Sweden

MoreLess

Report on the Use of a SMART Board Interactive Whiteboard to Enhance Literacy in Teens

This study investigated the effect of the interactive whiteboard to help teenagers connect symbolism with texts and enhance overall literacy. (Summer 2007)

Fortuna, Carolyn - Taylor High School
USA

MoreLess

Report on the Use of the SMART Board Interactive Whiteboard to Enhance Literacy in Children with Learning Disabilities

This study examined how, when embedded in the curriculum, the SMART Board interactive whiteboard can be used to improve students’ learning and motivation in the classroom. (Summer 2007)

Huck, Kelly & Schmitz, Doug - Bishop Roborecki School
USA

MoreLess

Enhancing Emergent Literacy Skills with SMART Board Interactive Whiteboard Technology

This study compared the academic performance of disabled students who learned emergent literacy on a digital whiteboard to that of students who received traditional literacy instruction. (Summer 2007)

Nordness, Philip - MacArthur Early Childhood Center
USA

MoreLess

The Aural Enabler: Creating a Way for Special Needs Kids to Participate in the Classroom Lesson

With a SMART Board interactive whiteboard being used for instruction, this study assesses the language skills of grades three and five special needs students. (Winter 2002)

Salinitri, Geri, Kara Smith and Christopher Clovis - University of Windsor
Canada

MoreLess

"Rita Skeeter's Quick-Quotes Quill": Developing a Harry Potter Curriculum

This study analyzed grade seven student and teacher creative-writing exercises. (Summer 2001)

Smith, Kara - University of Windsor
Canada

MoreLess

The Digital Whiteboard as a Tool in Increasing Student Attention During Early Literacy Instruction

This study examined literacy lessons in a grade one classroom. (Summer 2001)

Solvie, Pamela A. - Morris Area Elementary School
USA

MoreLess

What Classroom Technology Has Taught Me about Curriculum, Teaching, and Infinite Possibilities - Laura Christine Rochette

This report focuses on in-classroom experiences using interactive technology as tools for increasing reading and cultural literacy.

Rochette, Laura Christine - Marlborough School, Los Angeles
USA

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The Digital Whiteboard: A Tool in Early Literacy Instruction

This study on literacy concludes that "incorporating the digital whiteboard in our practice as a tool to teach early literacy skills may help us reach young children in many positive and powerful ways."

Solvie, Pamela A. – University of Minnesota
USA

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Improving Literacy Skills of At-Risk Students in a 1:1 Learning Environment – Toronto District School Board, Sympodium interactive pen display project (2008–2009)

This project explores how the Sympodium™ interactive pen display (now called SMART Podium) and SMART Notebook software have an impact on the literacy skills and achievement of at-risk students.

Lenchner, Leon
Canada

MoreLess
Math

Board or Bored?

The Nordic project focuses on the use of SMART board interactive whiteboards, classroom management tools, communication and evaluation to determine how effectively an interactive whiteboard, and other ICT tools, can be incorporated into a classroom. Observations of these factors include the search for innovation within educational design. The mixed methods study looked at 7th grade Norwegian language and Mathematics classrooms equipped with two SMART Boards each. As the study developed, teachers became more reflective in their practice and began to incorporate more digital technologies into their content. Students were more engaged in learning and collaborative discussion on content increased. The Notebook software supported the teacher identifying a more clear objective for the daily learning and lead students through engaging and directed discussions on the content. Study findings suggest teachers should forego reduplicating his or her traditional teaching methods when incorporating these new technologies, and instead develop new models for communication, reflection and evaluation with the goal of transforming their educational practices.

University Colleges in Vestfold, Buskerud, and Østfold and The Norwegian Centre for ICT in Education: Gunstiend Egeberg and Tor Arne Wolner (eds)
Norway

MoreLess

Text Competencies and Interaction in Technology-Enhanced Classrooms: Enriching and Developing Subject-Didactics with Interactive Whiteboard in Focus

The goal of this Swedish study was to develop students' textual competence and linguistic awareness in 6th grade classrooms. This qualitative study collected data in the form of observational studies, teacher interviews, a series of work shops, meetings, and student questionnaires. The project resulted in the students having the opportunity to meet and develop language in different contexts facilitated by the SMART Board interactive whiteboard. In addition, the technology facilitated learning and encouraged activities and dialogue related to mathematics content. Teachers and students developed competencies on several levels including integration of the IWB and increased integration of digital media and content through the use of Notebook software. Teachers believed that with the SMART Board, it was easy to create stimulating and engaging lessons to motivate students. Teachers were stimulated by the efficiency and simplicity of creating lessons. They felt the ability to plan, prepare, and save their Notebook lessons to continue another time enabled a more effective classroom experience. Further, students felt they learned more when the interactive whiteboard was used in the classroom because they could collaborate and more easily discuss concepts.

Sylvana Sofkova Hashemi, University West
Sweden

MoreLess

Student Teachers’ Use of Technology-Generated Representations: Exemplars and Rationales

In this study, researchers at the University of Virginia conclude that SMART Board™ interactive whiteboards improve student learning outcomes and teacher quality of life when used with appropriate pedagogy and digital resources.

Juersivich, Nicole, Joe Garofalo & Virginia Fraser - University of Virginia
USA

Read the SMART research brief at smarttech.com/UVA_brief.

MoreLess

Math Intervention “SMART” Project (Student Mathematical Analysis and Reasoning with Technology)

This project addressed improving grade one math scores through intervention programs. (Summer 2001)

Clemens, Anne, Traci Moore and Brian Nelson - Mueller Elementary School
USA

MoreLess

Using the SMART Board Interactive Whiteboard to Create a Hands-on Approach to Learning Mathematics

This project investigated the use of a digital whiteboard to teach linear, nonlinear and exponential relationships in five grade-eight math classes. (Summer 2007)

Delaney, Michelle - Woodstown Middle School
USA

MoreLess

Best Screen Play: A Comparison of Paired Team Play Using SMART Board Interactive Whiteboards versus Paired Individual Play Using Computers

This study analyzed the effectiveness of a SMART Board interactive whiteboard for grade six and seven students playing a mathematics computer game. (Summer 2000)

Klawe, Maria - University of British Columbia
Canada

MoreLess

The Effect of Student-directed versus Traditional Teacher-centered Presentations of Content on Student Learning in a High School Statistics Class

This study compared the effects of two different instructional delivery methods on student learning in a senior-level statistics classes. (Spring 2007)

Ottman, Laird - Haddon Heights Junior/Senior High School
USA

MoreLess

The Effect of the SMART Board Interactive Whiteboard on Raising State Test Scores

This project studied the effect of the introduction of an interactive whiteboard on raising test scores by enhancing motivation, attentiveness and comprehension in a grade-three math class. (Summer 2007)

Oleksiw, Tammy - Parma Community School
USA

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Report on the Use of SMART Board Interactive Whiteboard as a Tool to Develop an Understanding of Fractions

This study compared the academic performance and motivation of students who were taught fractions on a digital whiteboard to students who received conventional math instruction. (Summer 2007)

Preisig, Jessica K.D. - Powdersville Middle School
USA

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Math Motivation with SMART Board Technology

This project analyzed the motivational impact of the SMART Board interactive whiteboard on math students with disabilities. (Spring 2008)

Savoie, Marcy - Woodland Elementary School
USA

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Enhancing Native American Mathematics Learning: The Use of SMART Board-generated Virtual Manipulatives for Conceptual Understanding

Results of this research support the theory that Navajo elementary students exposed to a SMART Board interactive whiteboard for math instruction showed greater pretest to posttest gains than students whose teachers did not use the product.

Zittle, Frank J. - Center for Educational Evaluation & Research (CEER)
USA

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The Effects of the SMART Board Interactive Whiteboard on High School Students with Special Needs in a Functional Mathematics Class

This research project on the SMART Board interactive whiteboard investigated its effect on the achievement of 11 students with special needs in a functional mathematics class. The project concludes that the SMART Board interactive whiteboard appears to be a positive tool for assisting functional math achievement with these students.

Zirkle, Meredith L. – Eastern Mennonite University
USA

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The Value of Interactive Whiteboard Technology in Supporting Teacher Practice and Student Mathematics Achievement

Researchers involved in this project are tracking student achievement in math at 11 inner-city elementary schools in the Toronto District School Board. These schools all use SMART Board interactive whiteboards and SMART Notebook software in daily instruction. One aim of the study is to create a learning community that will help teachers develop the expertise to use interactive whiteboards to support and enrich the teaching of the elementary mathematics curriculum.

Toronto District School Board
Canada

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SMART Interactive White Board Utilization in Al-Shifaa Bint Ouf School – March 2010

The study conducted by the Jordan Education Initiative, examines the methods through which SMART Board interactive whiteboards have been integrated into the teaching strategies and learning experiences of teachers and students in grades eight and nine, focusing on the subjects of Mathematics and Science.

Jordan Education Initiative
Jordan

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A Constructivist Approach to Technology-Based Problem Solving

This study investigated whether using a SMART Board interactive whiteboard in a collaborative setting promotes mathematical problem solving. (Spring 2008)

Liberatore, Jill S. - Pickens County Middle School
USA

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Music

Music Teachers' Experiences: Learning through SMART Board Technology

This study offers a qualitative analysis of music-teacher training, with a particular focus on constructivist teaching and technology's role in it. (Summer 2002)

Wiggins, Jackie and Alex Ruthmann - Oakland University
USA

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Note taking

The Digital Whiteboard as a Notes-Taking Aid

This study analyzed students' attitudes toward, and test performance resulting from, the use of a digital whiteboard in an elementary statistics for the social sciences class. (Summer 2000)

Elvers, Greg - University of Dayton
USA

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Writing Improvements through the Whiteboard

This project measured the effectiveness of the SMART Board interactive whiteboard in improving student writing skills. (Spring 2008)

Gilbert, Carrie - Forestville Elementary
USA

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Science

Report on the Use of the SMART Board Interactive Whiteboard in Physical Science

This project measured the effectiveness of a SMART Board interactive whiteboard in physical science topics that require visualization of complex phenomena. (Summer 2000)

Damcott, Deborah, Janet Landato, Collette Marsh - Harper College
USA

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Elementary Science Lab Outreach Efforts: Extending Science Lessons to Support Improvements in Students' Study Skills and Math

This project sought to determine the most effective study methods for improving critical math skills for inner-city students. (Spring 2008)

Heirigs, Kathie & Thurmon, Halima - St. Joseph Catholic School
USA

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Enhancing Biology Instruction via Multimedia Presentations

This paper on multimedia best practices for biology instruction recommends interactive whiteboards because they have the "potential to increase students' participation and their responsibility for learning."

LeDuff, Rhonda - Middle College for Technology Careers High School
USA

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SMART Interactive White Board Utilization in Al-Shifaa Bint Ouf School – March 2010

The study conducted by the Jordan Education Initiative, examines the methods through which SMART Board interactive whiteboards have been integrated into the teaching strategies and learning experiences of teachers and students in grades eight and nine, focusing on the subjects of Mathematics and Science.

Jordan Education Initiative
Jordan

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Special education

Small Group Computer-Assisted Instruction With SMART Board Technology An Investigation of Observational and Incidental Learning of Nontarget Information

This investigation examined the effectiveness of teaching letter sounds in a small group arrangement using computer assisted instruction with SMART Board technology and a 3s constant time delay procedure to three students with learning disabilities. A multiple probe design across letter sound sets and replicated across students evaluate the effectiveness of the program and students' acquisition of other students' letter sounds through observational learning. In addition, students were assessed on their acquisition of incidental information presented in the instructive feedback statements following correct responses to target and nontarget stimuli. Results indicate that (a) the program was effective in teaching letter sounds to three students and (b) students acquired some letter sounds targeted for other students and incidental information (letter names) presented in the instructive feedback statements for their own and other group members' target stimuli. Findings are discussed in terms of presenting small group instruction through interactive white board technology.

Monica L. Campbell, Linda C. Mechling - University of North Carolina Wilmington
USA

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Investment vs. Return: Outcomes of Special Education Technology Research in Literacy for Students with Mild Disabilities

This article presents a review of the research on technology integration in the area of literacy for individuals with mild disabilities. It describes relevant legislation, including how special education technology is impacted by the No Child Left Behind Act (2001). Included studies focus on research in the core content areas of reading and written language most likely to impact inclusive classrooms. In the area of reading, research has investigated such technologies as the use of computer-assisted instruction and text-to-speech synthesis in reading instruction. Written language research in special education technology has studied the use of word processors, text-to-speech synthesis, word prediction, and spelling and grammar checkers.

Cindy L. Anderson, Kevin M. Anderson, Susan Cherup

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Impact of SMART Board Technology: An Investigation of Sight Word Reading and Observational Learning

Abstract: The effects of SMART Board technology, an interactive electronic whiteboard, and a 3s constant time delay (CTD) procedure was evaluated for teaching sight word reading to students with moderate intellectual disabilities within a small group arrangement. A multiple probe design across three word sets and replicated with three students was used to evaluate the effectiveness of SMART Board technology on:
(a) reading target grocery words;
(b) matching grocery item photos to target grocery words;
(c) reading other students' target grocery words through observational learning; and
(d) matching grocery item photos to observational grocery words. Results support use of this tool to teach multiple students at one time and its effects on observational learning of non-target information.

Linda C. Mechling, David L. Gast, Kristin Krupa

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Supporting Behavioural Disorders and Dyslexia on Digital Tables

While specialized technologies exist to support learners with special needs, the majority of disabled learners are mainstreamed into regular classrooms. For this reason, educational technologies must deliver both regular and special needs tailored instruction. We describe how our multi-touch table leverages personal space to help students with behavioural disorder learn together. For learner that cannot yet read, or those with difficulty reading, speech support can provide assistance while freeing a teacher to focus on other core competencies. (Summer 2012)

Jessica Szeto, Edward Tse, Min Xin - SMART Technologies
CANADA

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Gains in Self-Efficacy: Using SMART Board Interactive Whiteboard Technology in Special Education Classrooms

This project used cognitive/behavioral counseling, social-skills training, and the SMART Board interactive whiteboard to teach students with emotional/behavioral disorders. (Summer 2000)

Blanton, Bonnie & Helms-Breazeale, Rebecca - Augusta State University
USA

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Absenteeism: The Learning Gap Solution

This study explored alternative approaches to instructing students when they are absent from class, such as using a SMART Board interactive whiteboard and SMART Bridgit conferencing software. (Spring 2008)

Heimbigner, Deanna - Sierra Nevada College
USA

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Helping All Children Learn Action Research Project

This project records a teacher's observations of technology integration with grade three students, including two students with ADHD. (Summer 2002)

Jamerson, Joyce - Longfellow Elementary School
USA

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Report on the Use of the SMART Board Interactive Whiteboard to Enhance Literacy in Children with Learning Disabilities

This study compared the academic performance of disabled students who learned emergent literacy on a digital whiteboard to that of students who received traditional literacy instruction. (Summer 2007)

Nordness, Philip - MacArthur Early Childhood Center
USA

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The Aural Enabler: Creating a Way for Special Needs Kids to Participate in the Classroom Lesson

With a SMART Board interactive whiteboard being used for instruction, this study assesses the language skills of grades three and five special needs students. (Winter 2002)

Salinitri, Geri, Kara Smith and Christopher Clovis - University of Windsor
Canada

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SMART Technology Research Project at Dr. Gordon Townsend School

This research paper investigates the SMART Board interactive whiteboard’s potential impact on teaching and learning in an environment where many of the students have physical or mental difficulties. (Spring 2007)

Speight, Michelle and Curtis Slater - Dr. Gordon Townsend School
Canada

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Report on the Use of the SMART Board Interactive Whiteboard to Teach Language Arts to Children with Autism and Autistic-like Behaviors

This study compared the use of a SMART Board interactive whiteboard in teaching autistic children language arts to the use of a written newspaper containing identical information. (Summer 2007)

Wilcox, Jennifer - Kettering Middle School
USA

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The Effects of the SMART Board Interactive Whiteboard on High School Students with Special Needs in a Functional Mathematics Class

This research project on the SMART Board interactive whiteboard investigated its effect on the achievement of 11 students with special needs in a functional mathematics class. The project concludes that the SMART Board interactive whiteboard appears to be a positive tool for assisting functional math achievement with these students.

Zirkle, Meredith L. – Eastern Mennonite University
USA

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Using Classroom Amplification in a Universal Design Model to Enhance Hearing and Listening

This study shows that sound field amplification systems increase students’ ability to hear and listen, improve acoustical environments and alleviate teachers’ vocal strain. They are easy to use, cost no more than other technology used in the classroom and are an example of how universal design principles benefit everyone.

Millett, Pamela - York University
Canada

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The Use of Interactive Whiteboards and Touchscreens by Pupils Who have Profound and Multiple Learning Difficulties - Sean O’Sullivan

This report studies the impact of 2 different types of touch-sensitive technology (personal and collaborative) on levels of active participation on an ICT task with pupils who have profound and multiple learning difficulties (PMLD).

O’Sullivan, Sean – Banbury
United Kingdom

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Training and professional development

Report on the Use of the SMART Board Interactive Whiteboard to Enhance Literacy in Children with Learning Disabilities

This study examined how, when embedded in the curriculum, the SMART Board interactive whiteboard can be used to improve students’ learning and motivation in the classroom. (Summer 2007)

Huck, Kelly & Schmitz, Doug - Bishop Roborecki School
USA

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Technology and Teacher Preparation: Creating Learning Environments for Increasing Student Involvement and Creativity

This study investigated a specific instructional strategy consisting of action, brainstorming, and development. (Summer 2001)

Nonis, Aileen, and Blanche O’Bannon - University of Tennessee
USA

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Music Teachers' Experiences: Learning through SMART Board Technology

This study offers a qualitative analysis of music-teacher training, with a particular focus on constructivist teaching and technology's role in it. (Summer 2002)

Wiggins, Jackie and Alex Ruthmann - Oakland University
USA

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Student Teachers’ Use of Technology-Generated Representations: Exemplars and Rationales

In this study, researchers at the University of Virginia conclude that SMART Board™ interactive whiteboards improve student learning outcomes and teacher quality of life when used with appropriate pedagogy and digital resources.

Juersivich, Nicole, Joe Garofalo & Virginia Fraser - University of Virginia
USA

Read the SMART research brief at smarttech.com/UVA_brief.

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Professional development ensures the success of a school-wide SMART Board implementation

Study shows that using SMART Board interactive whiteboards improves the education experience for both teachers and students. This report analyzes a year-long study by researchers at the University of New Brunswick. They investigated the impact of combining relevant professional development with the use of SMART Board interactive whiteboards during a school‑wide SMART product implementation.

Morrison, Bill & Patricia Kirby – University of New Brunswick
Canada

Read the SMART summary of the interim report at smarttech.com/UNB_interim.

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About SMART

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Learn about SMART's history, awards and environment and quality policies. You'll also find executive biographies, recent media coverage and information on our commitment to the community.

       
SMART Technologies is a leading provider of technology solutions that enable inspired collaboration in schools and workplaces around the world by turning group work into a highly interactive, engaging and productive experience. SMART delivers an integrated solution of hardware, software and services designed for superior performance and ease of use, and remains a world leader in interactive displays.
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